A computer glitch in a system set up to assess risks of cardio vascular diseases may have resulted in many GP surgeries issuing inaccurate advice regarding the use of cholesterol lowering medication known as statins.

The system is designed to calculate risk factors to include pressure, weight, health problems and such like. This assists GP’s in advising patients for appropriate prescriptions. It has recently been discovered that results produced as far back as 2009 may have been inaccurate. This may have resulted in patients who need the medication, being advised not to take it and some patients who do not need it; being prescribed the medication.

This is obviously potentially a serious error that might have left many patients at risk of serious cardio vascular problems if they have not been prescribed the medication.

In addition there might be patients who are using the medication when they don’t need it. Potential consequences include the known side effects which can include depression, fatigue, muscular pain, diabetes and memory problems.

It is believed that the error dates back as far as 2009 and damage may have already been done for many people.

It is reported that news of this problem has understandably dented GP and patient confidence in the use of the systems involved. Some have questioned whether or not there might be problems in other systems used for giving similar advice.

Have you been affected by the statins computer glitch?

Something in the region of 1 in 3 GP practices used the IT software system. It is understood that surgeries have been provided with lists of patients to contact about the issue. If you have been affected or believe you might have suffered as a result then you may wish to obtain independent legal advice from a specialist personal injury lawyer.

At Barwells our specialist lawyers have extensive experience in representing many thousands of personal injury victims over the years to include medical and produce negligence claims.

If you would like any initial advice without obligation you can contact us on our Freephone number 0800 316 3555.